Success stories

 
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With support from the Genomics R&D Initiative, genomics research conducted at Fisheries and Oceans Canada has allowed for the re-opening of an important fishing ground for Indigenous people in Canada's North. The northern Dolly Varden charr is an important part of the diet, traditions and culture of the Inuvialuit and Gwich'in peoples in northern Canada.
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Based on research funded by the Genomics R&D Initiative, Fisheries and Oceans Canada is re-examining its approach to managing redfish stocks off Canada's east coast.
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Genomics-based test methods developed as part of a project funded by the Genomics R&D Initiative at Environment and Climate Change Canada are allowing more accurate, efficient, and sustainable tracking of diseases that threaten Canada's frog populations—diseases that have been responsible for large die-offs of frogs in Canada and other countries.
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Research funded by the Genomics R&D Initiative is transforming the way municipalities in Canada and around the world manage water safety at public beaches, often increasing effectiveness while reducing costs.
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A research project funded by the Genomics R&D Initiative at Environment and Climate Change Canada is showing how genomics can enable precise identification of the causes of environmental problems. Already, the city of Montreal has used this research to support its decision to invest $250 million in an ozone-treatment system for wastewater.
Funding from the Genomics R&D Initiative has supported the development of a genomics-based tool that will enhance the ability of food safety investigators to track the source of one of the most common causes of food poisoning in Canada: campylobacter, which sickens as many as 400,000 Canadians a year.
Funding from the Genomics R&D Initiative allowed some 50 researchers from six federal departments to work together on an unprecedented scale to enhance food safety in Canada.
Research funded through the Genomics R&D Initiative is helping soybean growers minimize the chances their crops will be damaged by soybean root rot. The fungus is estimated to cost Canadian soybean growers alone as much $50 million a year, with losses worldwide of some $2 billion annually.
Research funded by the Genomics R&D Initiative is playing a key part in the international effort to protect one of the world's most important food crops from the growing threat of fusarium head blight. The disease attacks wheat, leaving behind a number of mycotoxins that can cause serious illness in people or animals who consume food or feed made from infected wheat. Beyond its impact on the food supply, it is estimated the disease has cost Canadian wheat producers alone more than $1.5 billion in lost income since the mid-1990s.
A research project funded by the Genomics R&D Initiative at Natural Resources Canada has developed novel methods that will revolutionize tree breeding. Among other management measures, Canada's forest industry plants some 650 million trees every year.