Success stories

 
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Wheat, oats and barley are 3 of the most important cereal crops grown in Canada and the long-term health and competitiveness of this critical part of our agri-food sector depends on a number of factors, including the ability of plant breeders to develop new and better varieties. Researchers are using advanced genomics technologies to better target and accelerate the breeding process.
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Damage inflicted by insects costs the Canadian agricultural industry billions of dollars a year. Canadian researchers are helping to show how, in many cases, genomics-based approaches can reduce and even eliminate the need for chemical control.
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Researchers at the Public Health Agency of Canada have developed a computer-based tool for subtyping Salmonella bacteria. Called BioHansel, the new tool will allow enhanced surveillance, source attribution and risk assessment for Salmonella, one of the most common causes of food poisoning in Canada and the world.
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Research funded by the GRDI has found no evidence to suggest antimicrobial resistance in beef cattle is being transmitted to humans.
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Research funded by the Government of Canada's Genomics Research and Development Initiative (GRDI) has revealed that while antimicrobial resistance—AMR—may be transmitted to humans by food crops grown in fields fertilized with manure, readily available technologies can reduce the risk.
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Government of Canada researchers are unravelling a mystery that scientists around the world have been working on since the 1940s—understanding the genetic mechanisms that enable genes, including AMR genes—to move from one species of bacteria to another, a key element in understanding how AMR is transmitted.
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Funding from the federal Genomics Research and Development Initiative Antimicrobial Resistance project (GRDI‑AMR) has enabled researchers at the PHAC to assemble genetic data from thousands of bacterial isolates, as well as the bioinformatics tools needed to use the data to advance AMR research—including how and where antimicrobial resistance (AMR) can circulate among human, food production and the environment.
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GRDI funding has enabled researchers at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to routinely identify antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes in their genetic analysis of pathogenic bacteria such as disease-causing types of E. coli and Salmonella.
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New research into antimicrobial resistance (AMR) funded through the Government of Canada's Genomics Research and Development Initiative (GRDI) shows it may be possible to eliminate the preventive use of antibiotics in Canada's poultry industry.
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With funding from the GRDI, some two dozen federal scientists from 5 departments and agencies are collaborating in a major, 5-year research project in support of Canada's national action plan to address the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).